Institutional Repository

Psychosocial effects of poverty on the academic performance of the girl child in Zimbabwe

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Naidu, N.
dc.contributor.author Chinyoka, Kudzai
dc.date.accessioned 2014-01-16T05:38:19Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-16T05:38:19Z
dc.date.issued 2013-06
dc.identifier.citation Chinyoka, Kudzai (2013) Psychosocial effects of poverty on the academic performance of the girl child in Zimbabwe, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/13066> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/13066
dc.description.abstract Poverty has and will continue to precipitate enormous suffering for countless children in Zimbabwe. This study examines how the psychosocial effects of poverty affect the academic performance of the girl child. At the same time it identifies various policies and programmes designed to attenuate the negative effects of poverty on children. It is estimated that about seven out of ten families in Zimbabwe live in dire poverty because of political unrest, socioeconomic instability, economic and political sanctions, drought, environmental degradation, and HIV/AIDS. This study is informed by Urie Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory, and the humanistic perspective. A qualitative phenomenological design was used with focus group discussions, interviews and observations as data-collection instruments, with fifteen (15) Form 2 girls, six (6) teachers, and three (3) headmasters in three secondary schools in Masvingo Province. The use of the phenomenological design helped to bring to the surface deep issues, and to make the voices of the girl children heard. The Tesch’s open coding method of data analysis was used to identify themes and categories. Findings from this study revealed that the majority of the families in Zimbabwe cannot afford even the basic human needs (food and non-food items) which are necessary to sustain life, thus adversely affecting the children’s health, and their emotional, physical, moral, social and academic achievements. This study also established that the girls’ academic performance is affected by household chores/child labour, financial constraints, a lack of motivation, early marriages, and the lack of food, as well as health issues and sanitation, delinquent behaviour, child abuse, prostitution, the long distances to and from school, stigmatisation and marginalisation. This study recommends early intervention programmes for children, and the sustainable development of mining, rural and urban communities. The government, and the families, should make basic education affordable to all children, irrespective of their gender. This study also recommends that the problems be addressed by the microsystems of the school, and of the families, and the neighbourhood mesosystems (linkages) and exosystems, as well as by the macro-systems (political, ideology). Collaborative work is also needed among Zimbabweans and all stakeholders to revisit the root causes of poverty. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (xvii, 294 leaves) : col. ill.
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Academic performance en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Ecological en
dc.subject Girl child en
dc.subject Phenomenological en
dc.subject Poverty en
dc.subject Psychosocial en
dc.subject.ddc 373.1826942096891
dc.subject.lcsh Academic achievement -- Social aspects -- Zimbabwe -- Masvingo Province -- Case studies
dc.subject.lcsh Poor children -- Education (Secondary) -- Social aspects -- Zimbabwe -- Masvingo Province -- Case studies
dc.subject.lcsh Teenage girls -- Education (Secondary) -- Social aspects -- Zimbabwe -- Masvingo Province -- Case studies
dc.title Psychosocial effects of poverty on the academic performance of the girl child in Zimbabwe en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Psychology of Education en
dc.description.degree D. Ed. (Psychology of Education)


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UnisaIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics