Institutional Repository

An analysis of undergraduate philosophy of education students' perception of African philosophy

UnisaIR/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Venter, Elza
dc.contributor.author Letseka, Matsephe Martha
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-09T06:07:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-09T06:07:06Z
dc.date.issued 2012-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/7719
dc.description.abstract This study provides a critical interrogation of the perceptions held by the undergraduate Philosophy of Education students at an open and distance learning institution, towards African philosophy. The study is premised on famed Kenyan philosopher, Odera Henry Oruka‟s classification of African philosophy into four trends: ethno-philosophy, philosophic sagacity, nationalist-ideological philosophy and professional philosophy. These trends confirm that African philosophy is more than traditions, culture or ubuntu, and more complex than the students make it to be. The study makes a link between the students‟ flawed perceptions of African philosophy with their lack of critical thinking skills. The study has attempted to answer questions such as why students have flawed perceptions of African philosophy; how critical thinking assists in changing their perceptions of African philosophy, and what role can the education system play in equipping students with critical thinking skills. The study‟s findings show that undergraduate Philosophy of Education students conflate African philosophy with African people‟s traditions and cultures, and with ubuntu. Students perceive that African philosophy lacks reason and rationality - key elements of critical thinking. The study‟s findings show that students lack critical thinking skills. The study notes that the way students are taught makes a large contribution to their perceptions and lack of critical thinking skills. The study makes the following recommendations. Firstly, to deal with the problem of students‟ conflations, the study recommends the introduction of the principles of African philosophy, namely, ubuntu, communalism and indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) in the school curriculum, and to emphasise these principles in the curricula of higher education institutions. Secondly, the study recommends the introduction of philosophy for children (P4C) in schools. It is envisaged that P4C will assist learners to acquire critical thinking skills at an early stage of learning. Thirdly, the study recommends the teaching of critical thinking skills at universities. Finally, the study recommends that in- service training be made an integral part of teachers‟ and lecturers‟ professional training, to bring them up-to-date with new ideas and methods of teaching. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (xi, 215 leaves)
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject African philosophy en
dc.subject Africanisation en
dc.subject Ubuntu en
dc.subject Communalism en
dc.subject Indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) en
dc.subject Conflations en
dc.subject Critical thinking skills en
dc.subject Philosophy for children (P4C) en
dc.subject.ddc 370.1
dc.subject.lcsh College students -- South Africa -- Attitudes
dc.subject.lcsh Education -- Philosophy
dc.subject.lcsh Philosophy, African
dc.title An analysis of undergraduate philosophy of education students' perception of African philosophy en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Educational Studies en
dc.description.degree D. Ed. (Philosophy of Education)


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UnisaIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics