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Professional migrants in Cape Town : identity, culture and community

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dc.contributor.advisor De Jongh, M. (Prof.) en
dc.contributor.advisor Van Vuuren, C.J. (Prof.) en
dc.contributor.author Shea, Lenri en
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-25T11:00:33Z
dc.date.available 2009-08-25T11:00:33Z
dc.date.issued 2009-08-25T11:00:33Z
dc.date.submitted 2008-03-31 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/2118
dc.description.abstract Before the 1990's, African migrants did not perceive South Africa as an ideal migration destination. This changed after the end of the apartheid era. The new political climate in the country and the new migration movements linked to increased globalisation changed the situation significantly. South Africa became an attractive migration destination, particularly also for professional African migrants. In this dissertation a select group of black professional/skilled migrants from non-SADC countries, who are resident in Cape Town, are studied. It is shown that such transients defy any migration typology within the South African context. Their position in the world of economic migrants is not automatically one of cosmopolitanism, privilege and glamour. Their decision to migrate is also not necessarily voluntary. The explication and analysis of the context and circumstances of the migrants are conducted with specific reference to: - professional mobility vis a vis identity, culture and community - human mobility and globalisation - the demographics and legalities of immigration to South Africa - origin, identity and the construct of `home' - the `host' nation and perceptions, stereotypes and xenophobia - personal networks and adaptation - the notion of space becoming place. What is thus demonstrated and interrogated is that `belonging' in this world is a process of change and fluctuation. `Crossing borders' will mean different things to different people - especially also for skilled/professional migrants. Issues such as class, gender, race, citizenship, ethnicity and sexuality, play a role in how `belonging' is defined and how people assign meaning to movements across borders. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Professional migrants en
dc.subject Identity en
dc.subject Culture en
dc.subject Mobility en
dc.subject Migration en
dc.subject Stereotypes en
dc.subject Cape Town en
dc.subject Networks en
dc.subject Localities en
dc.subject Relationships en
dc.subject.lcsh Emigration and immigration -- South Africa -- Cape Town
dc.subject.lcsh Migration, Internal -- South Africa -- Cape Town
dc.subject.lcsh Immigrants -- South Africa -- Cape Town
dc.subject.lcsh Social integration -- South Africa -- Cape Town
dc.subject.lcsh Intercultural communication -- South Africa -- Cape Town
dc.subject.lcsh Cultural relations
dc.subject.lcsh Cape Town (South Africa) -- Emigration and immigration
dc.subject.lcsh Cape Town (South Africa) -- Ethnic relations
dc.title Professional migrants in Cape Town : identity, culture and community en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.contributor.email djagegjj@unisa.ac.za en
dc.description.department Anthropology and Archaeology en
dc.description.degree (MA (Anthropology)) en


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