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The effects of double-orphanhood on the learning and cognition of children living within child-headed households in Zimbabwe

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dc.contributor.advisor Maphalala, M. C.
dc.contributor.author Ganga, Emily
dc.date.accessioned 2013-10-15T05:43:45Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-15T05:43:45Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08
dc.identifier.citation Ganga, Emily (2013) The effects of double-orphanhood on the learning and cognition of children living within child-headed households in Zimbabwe, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/11834> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/11834
dc.description.abstract Among the many undesirable phenomenon within developing countries is „orphanhood‟ that seems to be precipitated by the escalating parental deaths mostly rooted in the devastating effects of HIV/AIDS and poverty. The phenomenological descriptive case study investigated the effects of double orphanhood on the cognition and learning of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) living within child-headed households (CHHs) in Chipinge District of Manicaland, Zimbabwe. The qualitative enquiry is tethered on a multi-dimensional concept of constructivism. The triangulated data were collected through participant observations, open-ended questionnaire, interviews and focus group discussions held at four secondary schools. The purposefully selected participants comprised 20 double orphans and vulnerable children, four headmasters, eight teachers, one Education Officer and one Social Welfare officer, making a total sample of 34. The study employed the Tesch‟s qualitative model of data analysis that led the findings into five major themes, each differentiating into sub-categories. The findings revealed that though most OVC try to remain resilient within their orphanhood predicament, they continue to suffer loneliness, inferiority complex, stresses, anxieties, low self-esteem, lack of concentration in class and more negativity that militates against effective assimilation and accommodation of learning materials within their ecological environment. The situation affected both sexes and was exacerbated by poverty, need deprivation and overwhelming household and parenting responsibilities. As such, most of the children‟s voiced responses expressed great despondence over their predicament. Other older OVC were contemplating dropping out of school in order to work, earn and look after their siblings. Even though some OVC reported occasional receipt of aid through donors and the government‟s facilities such as the Basic Education Assistance Module (BEAM), not all OVC were lucky to remain beneficiaries up to the end of their secondary schooling. vi Orphanhood was found to be a psychological deterrent to cognition and learning. Therefore, the local community, education administrators, policy makers, children‟s rights advocates together with the children‟s representatives should map out life-lines ideal for enhancing the cognitive learning of double OVC residing in CHHs. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (xv, 271 leaves) : col. ill., col. map, col. port.
dc.language.iso en en
dc.rights University of South Africa
dc.subject Orphanhood en
dc.subject Child-headed household en
dc.subject Orphans and vulnerable children en
dc.subject Learning en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Constructivism en
dc.subject Policy en
dc.subject Life-line en
dc.subject.ddc 370.1523086945096891
dc.subject.lcsh Orphans -- Education -- Zimbabwe -- Chipinge District -- Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Learning -- Zimbabwe -- Chipinge District
dc.subject.lcsh Cognition in adolescence -- Zimbabwe -- Chipinge District -- Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Learning, Psychology of
dc.subject.lcsh Child caregivers -- Zimbabwe -- Chipinge District -- Psychological aspects
dc.title The effects of double-orphanhood on the learning and cognition of children living within child-headed households in Zimbabwe en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Psychology of Education en
dc.description.degree D. Ed. (Psychology of Education)


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