School of Humanities

 

Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • Le Roux, Magdel (Brill, 1999)
    Judaism' is often adapted by groups who embrace it, then these groups are not accepted by Judaism proper. It is embraced for identity and identification (such as by the Falashas of Ethiopia). This embrace was encouraged ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (2004)
    Various traditions exist as to when the Lemba came to Africa. A possible early departure from Israel (according to the Lemba) can imply that their religion could contain remnants of a very ancient type of religion, which ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Brill, 2003)
    The oldest, recorded oral tradition ofthe Lemba of southern Africa, individually also known as mušavi (buyer/trader), nyakuwana (the man who finds the things which are bought), or mulungu ('white man' or 'the man from the ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Old Testament Society of South Africa (OTSSA), 2006)
    The remembered past is the material with which biblical Israel constructed its identity as a people, a religion, and a culture. It is a mixture of history, collective memory, folklore, and literary brilliance. In Israel's ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (2013)
    The immensity of Hezekiah's tribute payment to the Assyrian monarch, Sennacherib (2 Ki 18:14) has elicited limited reflection by scholars. Agriculture, generally believed to have formed the basis of the Judaean economy, ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (The Old Testament Society of Southern Africa (OTSSA), 2009)
    The Lemba in Southern Africa are a specific group with unique traditions regarding Israelite origins. Their oral traditions also contain significant information on the leading role their priestly family played on their ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Institute for Afro-Hellenic studies, 2013)
    The expression 'Pillars of Hercules', as well as 'Scylla and Charybdis' were used by some authors to indicate unworldly, mythological places. Did those waterways really exist or were they just part of the imagination of ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (SASNES (Southern African Society for Near Eastern Studies), 2007)
    From what we know of the historical sources, the Hellenistic period in the ancient Near East (more specifically ancient Israel), can be divided into four uneven phases. The first was the conquest of Palestine by Alexander ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Old Testament Society of South Africa (OTSSA), 2010)
    Scholars are divided as to the origins of the settlers in the highlands of Palestine, during Iron Age I. Some (e.g. Rainey) are convinced that they came from the east, while others (e.g. Dever) are of the opinion that they ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (AOSIS, 2006)
    Many early Christian churches incorporated a number of non-biblical, even "pagan" symbols and rituals into their liturgy (e. g. the origin of Christmas). They were contextualized into the church by a brand new Christian ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Institute for Afro-Hellenic studies, 2010)
    The recently much publicised genetic results of the Lemba placed the Lemba of Southern Africa in the spotlight (Thomas et al 1998; 2000; Soodyall 2010). From DNA samples, taken specifically from the Bhuba, the priestly ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (1997)
    The Lemba live among other ethnic groups in southern Africa, but consider themselves to be Israelites who, after the Babylonian exile, migrated to Africa, The possibility that the Lemba might have a' Semitic ancestry ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Old Testament Society of South Africa (OTSSA), 2007)
    According to the biblical narratives, the Israelites had wonderful expectations of the Promised Land which was to be theirs. The land was visualised as a land of plenty, God's gift to Israel, who would enjoy its fruits and ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Old Testament Society of South Africa (OTSSA), 2006)
    The article discusses some of the methodological problems raised by Georges Razafindrakoto's thesis 'Old Testament texts in Malagasy contexts'. Razafindrakoto's use of qualitative research methods as part of an Old Testament ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (AOSIS OpenJournals, 2012)
    This article investigates the 'illness' of King Saul (as narrated in the Old Testament). The 'anti-Saul narrative' states that 'God's spirit had left Saul' and 'an evil one had taken its place' (1 Sm 16:14; also cf. e.g. ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (University of Stellenbosch, 2009)
    The purpose of this article is to explore possible benefits, but also challenges and risks, of group supervision, as experienced by participants in a particular project, namely the'Africanisation of Biblical Studies' ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (2010)
    Sabaean (pre-Islamic Arabic) colonies were established in Ethiopia very early (at the beginning of the seventh century BC) as is proved by the characteristics of the Ethiopian language, religion and writing as well as ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (2016)
    The last account of the judges is that of Samson (Judges 13–16). This account has all the elements of a blockbuster. All the indications are that Samson would be an extraordinary person. And yet, even though Samson may be ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (SASNES (Southern African Society for Near Eastern Studies), 2004)
    Similar to oral traditions, written histories may exist in more than one version. The biblical story of the Queen of Sheba's visit to King Solomon has undergone an extensive elaboration in different literary traditions. ...
  • Le Roux, Magdel (Old Testament Society of South Africa (OTSSA), 2005)
    The endeavour to juxtapose the manners and customs of these two communities (African and early Israel), illuminates the understanding of the practices and rituals of both sides, and it stimulates new questions to be asked ...

View more