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1820 Setlers, open spaces, and theology: a reflection on how the 1820 Settlers' theological views shape our understanding of uninhabited land

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dc.contributor.author Grassow, Peter S
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-27T09:03:48Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-27T09:03:48Z
dc.date.issued 2012-12
dc.identifier.citation Grassow, Peter S. (2012), 1820 Setlers, open spaces, and theology: a reflection on how the 1820 Settlers' theological views shape our understanding of uninhabited land. Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae Vol. 38(2), pp. 163-171 en
dc.identifier.issn 1017-0499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/8119
dc.description Peer reviewed en
dc.description.abstract Not only did the English believe it was their right to colonise open spaces, they also believed that they had a God-given calling to cultivate all uncultivated land. They developed a theology of the land that held the Garden of Eden was ordered and cultivated, whereas those banished from the Garden were in an uncultivated wilderness. A successful English missionary would cultivate land as a sign of moral and spiritual success. This is illustrated through an account of how one group of settlers, the Sephton Party, placed a village on the African map. More specifically, I draw attention to how their chaplain, the Rev. William Shaw, provided religious sanction for the occupation of uninhabited land. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Church History Society of Southern Africa en
dc.rights © 2012 Church History Society of Southern Africa
dc.title 1820 Setlers, open spaces, and theology: a reflection on how the 1820 Settlers' theological views shape our understanding of uninhabited land en
dc.type Article en


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