Institutional Repository

Resisting, negotiating and imitating the empire: the complexities of empire as context for early Christians

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Botha, Pieter J.J.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-04-20T08:36:41Z
dc.date.available 2012-04-20T08:36:41Z
dc.date.issued 2011-12
dc.identifier.citation Botha,PJJ. 2011,' Resisting, negotiating and imitating the empire: the complexities of empire as context for early Christians', Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae, vol. 37, pp. 21-48. en
dc.identifier.issn 1017-0499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/5649
dc.description Peer reviewed. en
dc.description.abstract In recent years, empire has become a major field of research among New Testament scholars. In this article, after a brief review of two of the major exponents, I raise a number of critical issues. I make the point that early Christianities were not only caught in the web of Roman power, but eventually also adopted and developed imperial practices themselves. This means that empire must be central to exegetical and hermeneutical efforts. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Church History Society of Southern Africa en
dc.subject Early Christians
dc.subject Empire complexities
dc.title Resisting, negotiating and imitating the empire: the complexities of empire as context for early Christians en
dc.type Article en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UnisaIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics