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Lived and embodied suffering and healing amongst mothers and daughters in Chesterville Township, Kwazulu-Natal

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dc.contributor.advisor Zegeye, A. (Prof.)
dc.contributor.author Motsemme, Nthabiseng
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-23T09:02:05Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-23T09:02:05Z
dc.date.issued 2011-03
dc.identifier.citation Motsemme, Nthabiseng (2011) Lived and embodied suffering and healing amongst mothers and daughters in Chesterville Township, Kwazulu-Natal, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/5451> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/5451
dc.description.abstract This is a transdisciplinary study of how ‘popular cultures of survival’ regenerate and rehumanise township residents and communities whose social fabric and intergenerational bonds have been violently torn by endemic suffering. I focus specifically on township mothers’ and daughters’ lifeworlds with the aim of recentering these marginalised lives so that they can inform us about retheorising marginality and in this way enrich our limited academic discourses on the subjectivities of poor urban African women. Located in the interdisciplinary field of popular culture studies, the study draws on and synthesises theoretical insights from a number of disciplines such as sociology, political-science, anthropology, history, literary studies, womanist and feminist studies and indigenous studies, while using a variety of methods and sources such as interviews, reports, observation, newspapers, field notes, photo-albums, academic articles and embodied expressions to create a unique theory on the lived and embodied suffering and healing experiences of township women. I have called this situated conceptual framework that is theoretically aligned to African womanism and existential phenomenology, but principally fashioned out of township mothers and daughters ways of understanding the world and their place in it--Township mothers’ and daughters’ lived and embodied ‘cultures of survival’. And in order to surface their popular cultural survival strategies I have adopted an African womanist interpretative phenomenological methodological framework. This suggested conceptual and methodological framework has allowed me to creatively explore the dialectical tensions of the everyday township philosophies, aesthetics and moralities of ‘ukuphanta’, to hustle and ‘ukuhlonipha’, to respect, and show how they create the moral-existential ground for township mothers and daughters not only to continue to survive, but to reclaim lives of dignity and sensuality amidst repeated negation and historical hardships. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (xv, 288 leaves)
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Township studies en
dc.subject African womanism en
dc.subject Existential phenomenology en
dc.subject Popular cultures of survival en
dc.subject Embodied suffering en
dc.subject.ddc 305.4844209684
dc.subject.lcsh Knowledge, Sociology of
dc.subject.lcsh Existential phenomenology
dc.subject.lcsh Poor women -- South Africa -- KwaZulu-Natal -- Social conditions
dc.subject.lcsh Women, Black -- South Africa -- KwaZulu-Natal -- Social conditions
dc.subject.lcsh Social conflict -- South Africa -- KwaZulu-Natal
dc.subject.lcsh Mothers and daughters -- South Africa -- KwaZulu-Natal -- Social conditions
dc.subject.lcsh Urban poor -- South Africa -- KwaZulu-Natal -- Social conditions
dc.subject.lcsh KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) -- Social life and customs
dc.subject.lcsh Chesterville Township (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa)
dc.title Lived and embodied suffering and healing amongst mothers and daughters in Chesterville Township, Kwazulu-Natal en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Sociology
dc.description.degree D.Litt. et Phil. (Sociology)


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