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Simon Maimela in the chamber of African Theology: a methodological challenge!

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dc.contributor.author Masoga, Mogomme Alpheus
dc.contributor.author Mokadi, Max Mathye
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-11T13:31:16Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-11T13:31:16Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Masoga, MA & Mokadi, MM. 2010,'Simon Maimela in the chamber of African Theology : a methodological challenge!', Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae, vol. XXXVI, pp. 67-80. en
dc.identifier.issn 1017-0499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/4590
dc.description Peer reviewed en
dc.description.abstract Reverend Professor Simon Sekone Maimela’s contribution to the South African theological discourse is remarkable. He has published widely in the field and managed to weave his Lutheran studies into Black Theology debates and discussions. His book entitled: Proclaim Freedom to my people, speaks to the heart and discusses liberation in the heat of socio-economic and political struggles during the apartheid era in South Africa. There is no doubt that Maimela successfully formulated significant theological postulates at the time. This article aims to engage with Maimela at the centre of the dialogue about African Theology and Black Theology. The article recognises the ex ante debates that were largely sparked by the paper published by Reverend Dr Manas Buthelezi and in which he analysed and highlighted shortcomings of what he called the “ethnographical approach” of practicing theology in Africa. Instead Buthelezi opted head on for the “anthropological” approach given its existential focus and structure, dealing with the current issues and realities that confront humanity. According to Buthelezi, the “anthropological” approach is both urgent and agitating and is different from the “ethnographical” approach. It is evident that Maimela was part of the team of Black Theology scholars in South Africa that pioneered the course for Black Theology and had to engage with this “classic” debate: whither “anthropological” theology, whither “ethnographical” theology? The article introduces what could 1 Corresponding author – dithobela@webmail.co.za, former dean of Pretoria Circuit (PC), Central Diocese (CD) of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Southern Africa (ELCSA) and currently the Research Fellow in African Musicology at the Department of Art History, Visual Arts and Musicology, University of South Africa. Contact address: No. 104 North Stock City, 180 Mears Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa. 2 Former Pretoria Circuit Council Secretary – mokadim@mweb.co.za and final year M Phil (Theology) degree student at the University of Pretoria, Theology Faculty specializing in Theology of Missions. Contact address: P.O. Box 50, Tembisa North, 1634, South Africa. Simon Maimela in the chamber of African Theology: … 2 be termed the closing phase of Maimela’s active theologising in engaging the subject under discussion. The article argues for a recast of the current theological method applied to research and teaching at seminaries and universities. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Church History Society of Southern Africa en
dc.subject African theology
dc.title Simon Maimela in the chamber of African Theology: a methodological challenge! en
dc.type Article en


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