Institutional Repository

Simon Maimela as Public Theologian of the 1980s and 1990s

UnisaIR/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Landman, Christina
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-11T13:24:59Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-11T13:24:59Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Landman, C. 2010,'Simon Maimela as Public Theologian of the 1980s and 1990s', Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae, vol. XXXVI, pp. 49-65. en
dc.identifier.issn 10170-0499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/4574
dc.description Peer reviewed en
dc.description.abstract This article traces the public career of Simon Maimela (1944–) during the 15 years between 1980, when he was appointed as the first black lecturer in the Faculty of Theology at the University of South Africa, and 1996, when he handed over the position as international coordinator of EATWOT, the Ecumenical Association for Third World Theologians, to Mercy Amba Oduyoye. Although “Public Theology” was not a current designation during the 1980s and 1990s, this article presents Maimela as a forerunner of Public Theology through his contribution to Black Theology and his influence on public opinion formation. The sources consulted include newspaper reports on his public lectures and involvement in public statements on political situations. His articles on Liberation Theology in academic and semi-academic journals and his inaugural lecture are acknowledged as the source of views that contributed to the political transition to democracy in South Africa; all of Maimela’s academic articles are derived from papers delivered at conferences to which the public had primary or secondary access. Study material on Liberation Theology prepared by Maimela while teaching Systematic Theology at the University of South Africa is cited to reveal his then novel view on feminist theology in particular. The publications of the Institute for Contextual Theology (ICT) and EATWOT are investigated to show Maimela’s role in the application of Liberation Theology to the public sphere. The article concludes by summarising Maimela’s role as teacher, public speaker and public opinion former within his own vision of Black Theology as prophetic theology. The part he played places him among the most influential Black Theologians of the last two decades of the twentieth century, and possibly of the first decade of the twenty-first. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Church History Society of Southern Africa en
dc.subject Public theologian
dc.subject Simon Maimela
dc.title Simon Maimela as Public Theologian of the 1980s and 1990s en
dc.type Article en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UnisaIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics