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"An oasis in a desert of segregation": factors that led to the rise and decline of the Edendale Lay Ecumenical Centre in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Kumalo, R. Simangaliso
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-11T13:16:30Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-11T13:16:30Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Kumalo, R.S. 2009,"An oasis in a desert of segregation" : factors that led to the rise and decline of the Edendale Lay Ecumenical Centre in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa', Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae, vol. XXXV, pp. 37-65. en
dc.identifier.issn 1017-0499
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/4552
dc.description Peer reviewed en
dc.description.abstract One way to comprehend the historical development of theological education in the South African context is to employ the case study approach. This approach enables us to understand the factors and dynamics that shaped and influenced particular projects and thereby extract vital lessons for doing theological education effectively in our contemporary context. The Edendale Lay Ecumenical Centre (ELEC) is but one such project that contributed immensely to the development of theological education through the training of lay leadership for the church and society in South Africa during the difficult years of apartheid. Despite the fact that this centre was the only one of its kind aimed at the empowerment of lay leadership, being ecumenical in orientation and founded and managed by black people, it is surprising that it has been virtually neglected by historiographers. This article intends to critically examine the factors which have led to the rise of ELEC through its founder, the Rev Enos Zwelabantu Sikakane. Its focus will be to look at its historical development and primary objective of providing a theological education characterised by four pillars, namely; laity, ecumenism, context, and political relevance. It will also look at the mitigating factors that led to the collapse of this ambitious project. Through telling the story of ELEC, the article strives to demonstrate a number of factors that have shaped the successes and failures of theological education initiatives in the South African context as well as the lessons one needs to take into consideration if an effective and sustainable theological education is to be provided in the future. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Church History Society of Southern Africa en
dc.subject Edendale Lay Ecumenical centre
dc.subject Segregation
dc.title "An oasis in a desert of segregation": factors that led to the rise and decline of the Edendale Lay Ecumenical Centre in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa en
dc.type Article en


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