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The job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged secondary schools in the North West Province

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dc.contributor.advisor Schulze, S.
dc.contributor.author Maforah, Tsholofelo Pauline
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-15T08:44:44Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-15T08:44:44Z
dc.date.issued 2010-11
dc.identifier.citation Maforah, Tsholofelo Pauline (2010) The job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged secondary schools in the North West Province, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/4375> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/4375
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the factors that affect the job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged secondary schools in the North West Province. The aims of the study were to determine empirically, through quantitative and qualitative means, the factors that influence the job satisfaction of the principals, and to make recommendations of ways to improve their job satisfaction. In the quantitative phase the research design was a survey. Data were collected from a purposefully selected sample of 30 principals of 30 secondary schools conveniently situated and accessible, in rural villages and townships. Thereafter a phenomenological approach was used to select eight principals from the same sample. The aim was to, by means of interviews, find clarity on the trends observed in the quantitative phase. The researcher purposefully selected participants representing a maximum variation regarding gender, geographical location, and years of experience as a teacher or a headmaster. The results indicated that the factors that enhanced the job satisfaction of the selected principals related to the nature of their work in the sense that it was stimulating, important and varied. Their interpersonal relationships were also gratifying. These relationships referred to cooperative staff, appreciative colleagues and supervisors, well-behaved learners, and supportive parents. Specific factors also brought about job dissatisfaction. In particular, the majority of the principals were frustrated with poor management on the part of the Department of Education. This was linked to a lack of autonomy of the principals, excessive bureaucracy, and poor policies. The principals believed that these policies exacerbated the problems they already had with ill-disciplined learners, the poor work ethics of some educators, unsatisfactory matriculation results, pitiable physical working conditions, and uninvolved parents.Results from the research also showed that the principals thought their workloads were not aligned to their salaries, and that reward systems were needed. Recommendations to enhance the job satisfaction of the principals of the identified secondary schools were made to the SGB and other school managers, as well as to the Department of Education, and recommendations for future research were also put forward. Finally, a number of limitations of the study were pointed out. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (vii, 201 leaves)
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Job satisfaction en
dc.subject Principals en
dc.subject Job dissatisfaction en
dc.subject.ddc 373.12012096824
dc.subject.lcsh High school principals -- Job satisfaction -- South Africa -- North-West
dc.subject.lcsh High school principals -- South Africa -- North-West -- Attitudes
dc.subject.lcsh Teacher morale -- South Africa -- North-West
dc.subject.lcsh School management and organization -- South Africa -- North-West
dc.title The job satisfaction of principals of previously disadvantaged secondary schools in the North West Province en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Educational Studies
dc.description.degree D. Ed. (Education Management)


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