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Practice guidelines for the integration of child-headed households into extended families

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dc.contributor.advisor Alpaslan, A.H. (Dr.)
dc.contributor.author Nziyane, Luzile Florence
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-02T11:58:56Z
dc.date.available 2011-02-02T11:58:56Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05
dc.identifier.citation Nziyane, Luzile Florence (2010) Practice guidelines for the integration of child-headed households into extended families, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3985> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3985
dc.description.abstract The family as the basic unit of society plays an important role in the lives of individuals especially children. The HIV/AIDS epidemic has devastated the family structure which is already strained by other detrimental factors such as urbanisation and poverty. The increased death rate of young parents due to AIDS-related diseases has led to an escalating number of orphaned children growing in child headed households (CHH) without adult care. A qualitative study was undertaken to develop an understanding of the barriers that hinder the integration of orphaned children into extended family folds and to obtain suggestions on how to overcome these barriers. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted in Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province, with a sample of children heading CHH, relatives of these children and social workers who were rendering social work services to these client-systems. The study revealed that the level of suffering faced by CHH began with the illness of the parents. This was further exacerbated by the death of the parents as these children were not absorbed by their extended families. Barriers that hindered the integration of orphaned children into extended family folds go beyond the extended families’ economic capacity to absorb the children. There is an interplay of barriers that are poverty related, relational and family related, culturally related, circumstances that are related to the orphaned children as well as limitations in social work service delivery. The findings indicate that CHH is not a good option to care and protect orphaned children as it exposes them to pervasive adversities with little resources and support. The integration of orphaned children is embraced as a good option to care for the children because of its potential value, amongst others, of enabling the extended families to relieve the CHH from the burden of care. From the findings of this study, practice guidelines were developed to enhance the efficacy of integrating orphaned children into extended families to prevent the CHH phenomenon. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Child-headed households en
dc.subject HIV/AIDS en
dc.subject Social work en
dc.subject Parental responsibilities en
dc.subject Psychosocial support en
dc.subject Succession planning en
dc.subject Ophaned children en
dc.subject.lcsh Orphans -- Services for -- South Africa -- Bosbokrand
dc.subject.lcsh Children of AIDS patients -- Services for -- South Africa -- Bosbokrand
dc.subject.lcsh Child caregivers -- South Africa --Bosbokrand
dc.subject.lcsh AIDS (Disease) -- Social aspects --South Africa -- Bosbokrand
dc.title Practice guidelines for the integration of child-headed households into extended families en
dc.type Thesis en


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