Institutional Repository

Determination of the G and P types of previously nontypeable rotavirus strains from the African notavirus network, 1996–2004 : identification of unusual G types

UnisaIR/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Esona, Mathew Dioh
dc.contributor.author Kerin, Tara
dc.contributor.author Peenze, Ina
dc.contributor.author Nicola Page, James Nyangao
dc.contributor.author Akran Agbaya, Veronigue
dc.contributor.author Aminu, Maryam
dc.contributor.author Sebunya,Theresia
dc.contributor.author Glass, Roger
dc.contributor.author Steele, Duncan
dc.contributor.author Armah, George
dc.contributor.author Page, Nicola
dc.contributor.author Nyangao, James
dc.contributor.author Trabelsi, Abdelhalim
dc.contributor.author Gentsch, Jon
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-18T10:35:36Z
dc.date.available 2011-01-18T10:35:36Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09
dc.identifier.citation DOI: 10.1086/653552 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3933
dc.description Acknowledgments: The postdoctoral fellowship of Dr Esona was provided through the Rotavirus Vaccine Program, a collaboration between the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, the World Health Organization, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our sincere thanks also go to all the staff of the Medical Research Council Diarrhoeal Pathogens Research Unit, University of Limpopo, and the Gastroenteritis and Respiratory Viruses Laboratory Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and revention,Atlanta, for their immense assistance. en
dc.description.abstract A total of 215 nontypeable rotavirus samples collected from children 5 years of age by members of the African Rotavirus Network were characterized using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing. The most predominant strain identified was P[8]G1 (46.9%). Genotypes P[8]G10, P[8]G8, P[6]G8, and P[7]G5 were also detected at frequencies varying from 0.5% to 2.3%. This study suggests that reassortment of unusual G types into a background of globally common genotype P[8] strains may be a major mechanism of generating rotavirus diversity. Nucleotide substitutions at the P[8], P[6], and G1 primer binding sites accounted for the failure to type these strains initially. Hence, these findings highlight the need for regular evaluation of rotavirus genotyping methods. en
dc.description.sponsorship Financial support: World Health Organization (grant V27/181/113), Norwegian Programme for Development, Research and Higher Education (research grant PRO 48/2002), and Rotavirus Vaccine Program, PATH (grant GAV.1142–01-07211-SPS). Supplement sponsorship: This article is part of a supplement entitled “Rotavirus Infection In Africa: Epidemiology, Burden of Disease, and Strain Diversity,” which was prepared as a project of the Rotavirus Vaccine Program, a partnership among PATH, the World Health Organization, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and was funded in full or in part by the GAVI Alliance. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher The University of Chicago Press en
dc.subject Rotavirus en
dc.subject Rotavirus genotyping methods en
dc.subject African Rotavirus Network en
dc.subject Genotypes P[8]G10 en
dc.subject Genotypes P[8]G1 en
dc.subject Genotypes P[6]G8 en
dc.subject Genotypes P[8]G8 en
dc.subject Genotypes P[7]G5 en
dc.title Determination of the G and P types of previously nontypeable rotavirus strains from the African notavirus network, 1996–2004 : identification of unusual G types en
dc.type Article en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UnisaIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics