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How do professionals develop? Lessons for the effective implementation of the South African Skills Development Act

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dc.contributor.author Steyn, G.M.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-12T07:48:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-12T07:48:30Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Steyn, GM. 2004. How do professionals develop? Lessons for the effective implementation of the South African Skills Development Act. South African Journal of Education, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 217–224. [http://www.sajournalofeducation.co.za] en
dc.identifier.issn 0256-0100
dc.identifier.uri [http://www.sajournalofeducation.co.za
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3416
dc.description.abstract Strategy (NSDS), have been initiatives to develop the people of South Africa and to provide educational and economic opportunities for all. In order to implement NSDS, 25 Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have been established within different economic sectors that cover the South African economy. The SETA Education, Training and Development Practices, known by the acronym ETDP SETA, is responsible for promoting and facilitating the delivery of education, training, and development. Delivering quality education and training is currently one of the most important endeavours for the restoration of the culture of teaching and learning. Professional development (PD) of educators is seen as an essential ingredient for promoting the delivery of education and training and improving learners' performance. Despite research findings, the development of many PD programmes rests on faulty assumptions of such research or on no research at all. The purpose of the paper is twofold: to explain why some PD programmes have been unsuccessful, and to outline key factors that may influence the effective implementation of PD in schools and ultimately the effectiveness of the NSDS in educational circles. Specific categories that are highlighted include learning styles of educators, educator commitment, transformational leadership, out-of-school conditions, in-school conditions, and requirements of programmes. According to the model for PD, the design of PD requires a new way of thinking and interacting and, most importantly, should be a step towards improved educator and learner performance for the sake of effective knowledge and skills development. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Foundation for Education Science and Technology en
dc.relation.ispartofseries South African Journal of Education en
dc.subject Professional development en
dc.subject Skills Development Act en
dc.title How do professionals develop? Lessons for the effective implementation of the South African Skills Development Act en
dc.type Article en


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