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Training disciplined soldiers for Christ : the influence of American fundamentalism on Prairie Bible Institute during the L.E. Maxwell Era (1922-1980)

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dc.contributor.advisor Gundani, Paul
dc.contributor.author Callaway, Timothy Wray
dc.date.accessioned 2010-06-14T08:49:17Z
dc.date.available 2010-06-14T08:49:17Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05
dc.identifier.citation Callaway, Timothy Wray (2010) Training disciplined soldiers for Christ : the influence of American fundamentalism on Prairie Bible Institute during the L.E. Maxwell Era (1922-1980), University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3369> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3369
dc.description.abstract This study presents an insider’s view concerning the significant influence of American fundamentalism at Prairie Bible Institute (Three Hills, Alberta, Canada) during the tenure of the school’s co-founder and primary leader, Leslie Earl Maxwell. During much of the period covering 1922-1980, PBI rivaled well-known American schools such as Moody Bible Institute, the Bible Institute of Los Angeles (BIOLA) and Columbia Bible College in Columbia, South Carolina, in size. These schools were also highly efficient in producing hundreds of missionaries and Christian workers to serve the fundamentalist cause in North America and around the world. As a belated response to Dr. John Stackhouse, Jr.’s portrayal of PBI in his 1993 book, Canadian Evangelicalism in the Twentieth Century: An Introduction to Its Character, this thesis offers clarification and modification to Stackhouse’s work regarding how PBI during the Maxwell era should be viewed by students of church history. It is argued here that the ubiquitous influence of the United States of America on Canadian life is clearly visible in the nature of the Christian fundamentalism that prevailed at PBI under Maxwell’s leadership. The work thereby lends a certain amount of credibility to the suggestions made by some scholars that PBI during Maxwell’s career might legitimately be considered an outpost of American fundamentalism. Employing primarily a quantitative assessment of the evidence in combination with personal anecdotes and a few basic statistics, the thesis reveals that Maxwell’s personality and rhetoric were consistently more militant than Stackhouse allows. PBI’s affinity for many of the distinctives of American fundamentalist theology and culture are also documented. Such an approach serves the additional purpose of enabling the writer to call into question the utility of considering militancy the defining characteristic of twentieth-century evangelicalism when considered from a post-9/11 perspective. It also enables a challenge of Stackhouse’s assumption that what he identifies as “sectish” Canadian evangelicalism is ultimately as substantially different from American fundamentalism as the Canadian scholar infers. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (515 leaves)
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Fundamentalism en
dc.subject Religious fundamentalism en
dc.subject Canadian fundamentalism en
dc.subject Prairie Bible Institute en
dc.subject Canadian religion en
dc.subject Three Hills en
dc.subject John G. Stackhouse en
dc.subject Alberta en
dc.subject.ddc 200.904
dc.subject.lcsh Religious fundamentalism
dc.subject.lcsh America -- Religion
dc.subject.lcsh Christian life -- Study and teaching
dc.subject.lcsh Prairie Bible Institute
dc.title Training disciplined soldiers for Christ : the influence of American fundamentalism on Prairie Bible Institute during the L.E. Maxwell Era (1922-1980) en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department Christian Spirituality, Church History and Missiology
dc.description.degree D.Th. (Church History)


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