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Are Alternative Information Services Compensating for Dysfunctional School Libraries in South Africa? The Case of Limpopo Province

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dc.contributor.author Mojapelo, Samuel Maredi
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-28T11:29:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-28T11:29:15Z
dc.date.issued 2016-04-18
dc.identifier.citation Mojapelo, Samuel Maredi 2016 Are Alternative Information Services Compensating for Dysfunctional School Libraries in South Africa? The Case of Limpopo Province LIBRI 2016; 66(3): 179–199 en
dc.identifier.citation Libri. Volume 66, Issue 3, Pages 179–199, ISSN (Online) 1865-8423, ISSN (Print) 0024-2667, DOI: 10.1515/libri-2015-0104, August 2016
dc.identifier.issn 1865-8423
dc.identifier.other DOI 10.1515/libri-2015-0104
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/21818
dc.identifier.uri https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr.2016.66.issue-3/libri-2015-0104/libri-2015-0104.xml
dc.description Due to copyright restrictions, the full-text of this article is not attached to the item record. Please follow the link at the top of this record to the online published article.
dc.description.abstract Owing to uneven resource-provisioning during the apartheid era, dysfunctional library facilities are a major concern in the majority of South African schools. Since only 7% of state schools have functional school libraries, teaching and learning are negatively affected. The article is limited to just one part of a research project which investigated the Provision of School Libraries in Public High Schools in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. The purpose of the study was to investigate alternative information services which teachers and learners could use to meet curriculum-related needs because library facilities in most state high schools in the province are dysfunctional. The study involved a quantitative research design. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect quantitative data from principals or teacher-librarians. The findings show that the majority of schools, particularly in disadvantaged rural communities, are some distance away from alternative information services, thereby restricting teachers’ and learners’ access to information. The study recommends that the government should ensure that more alternative information services are available to improve the quality of education in these schools. The social ecosystem, that is, partnerships among information services, should be encouraged to meet dynamic and evolving information needs of the multiple users. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher De Gruyter en
dc.subject school libraries
dc.subject state high schools
dc.subject learner-centred education
dc.subject alternative information services
dc.subject South Africa
dc.title Are Alternative Information Services Compensating for Dysfunctional School Libraries in South Africa? The Case of Limpopo Province en
dc.type Article en
dc.description.department Information Science en


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