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The African Philosophy of "Ubuntu" and Correctional Education in South Africa: A case study

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dc.contributor.author Johnson, LR
dc.contributor.author Quan-Baffour, KP
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-08T12:45:58Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-08T12:45:58Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02
dc.identifier.isbn 978-0-9942689-1-4
dc.identifier.uri http://afsaap.org.au/assets/johnson-and-quan-baffour.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/20967
dc.description.abstract The South African history and circumstances have resulted in many families in South Africa living on the edge of survival. Many young people who break the law have no basic education for employment and many have no source of livelihood and thus cannot make ends meet. While “prison” inmates have wronged other citizens through crimes, the African philosophy of “Ubuntu” (forgiveness and love) reflected in this article addresses the love and forgiveness values. The young and adult offenders are offered correctional education meant to equip them with knowledge and skills to show that, based on Ubuntu, they are forgiven and equipped with skills for livelihood. The article interrogates their perceptions on “prison” curriculum or correctional education offered in South African correctional centres, based on the African indigenisation principles. In establishing what curriculum issues are addressed through teaching and learning activities, the study used the qualitative research method to interview 9 inmates participating in formal, non-formal and informal correctional programmes offered in the three correctional facilities in Pretoria, South Africa. Underpinning the study is the “Ubuntu” ecological systems theory on the effectiveness of the indigenised curriculum practices for African and community-based needs. While the majority of offenders attach value to the correctional education offered, some believe the needs-based curriculum must emanate from their vocational and employment-based prerequisites. The study recommends that curriculum offered in correctional facilities in South Africa must promote the philosophy of “Ubuntu” to solve the African crime levels; thus, “it takes the whole village to raise a child”. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher The African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) en
dc.subject Ubuntu offender programme en
dc.subject indigenous programme en
dc.subject South Africa en
dc.subject correctional education en
dc.title The African Philosophy of "Ubuntu" and Correctional Education in South Africa: A case study en
dc.type Article en
dc.description.department ABET and Youth Development en


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