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Lost his voice? interrogating the representations of sexualities in selected novels by Gabriel Garc{226}ia M{226}arquez.

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dc.contributor.author Manyarara, Barbra Chiyedza
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-01T10:50:28Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-01T10:50:28Z
dc.date.issued 2013-11
dc.identifier.citation Manyarara, Barbra Chiyedza (2013) Lost his voice? interrogating the representations of sexualities in selected novels by Gabriel Garc{226}ia M{226}arquez., University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/18672> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/18672
dc.description.abstract This thesis interrogates García Márquez’s representations of sexualities in the following selected novels: Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1981); The Autumn of the Patriarch (1975); One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967); The Sad and Incredible Tale of Innocent Erendira and her Heartless Grandmother (1972); and Memories of My Melancholy Whores (2004). It is argued here that García Márquez’s employment of the sexuality motif enables him to delve into many worldwide current concerns such as the irrelevance of some socio-cultural sexual practices; commercial sexual exploitation of children; the different manifestations of prostitution; and female powerlessness under autocratic rule. Earlier literary critics have tended to narrowly interpret García Márquez’s employment of the sexuality motif as just a metaphor for colonial exploitation of the colonised. The study also explores the writer’s artistic role and concludes that García Márquez speaks against commercial sexual exploitation of children as he concurrently speaks on behalf of children so exploited. Similarly, the writer speaks on behalf of prostituted womanhood by showing how prostitutional gains do not seem to cascade down to the prostitutes themselves. García Márquez also invests female sexual passivity as a coping mechanism against a dictator’s limitless power over the life and death of his citizens. However, the writer also constructs female agency that grows from the rejection of an initial victimhood to develop into an extremely flawed and corrupt flesh trade that co-opts and indentures children into sex work with impunity. Thus the study breaks new ground to show that García Márquez’s representations of different sexualities are not merely soft porn masquerading as art. His is a voice added to the worldwide concerns over commercial sexual exploitation of children in the main and also the recovery of a self-reliant female self-hood that was previously inextricably bound to male sexual norms. Quite clearly, García Márquez demonstrates that female prostitution is driven by a lack of social safety nets, a lack of other economically viable options and also a distinct lack of educational opportunities for female economic independence, hence the flawed female agency. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Agency en
dc.subject Alterity en
dc.subject Colonialism en
dc.subject Commercial sexual exploitation of children en
dc.subject Grotesquery en
dc.subject Hispanic en
dc.subject Honour killing en
dc.subject Incest en
dc.subject Machismo en
dc.subject Marianismo en
dc.subject Prostitution en
dc.subject Representation en
dc.subject Sexual passitivity en
dc.subject Silence en
dc.title Lost his voice? interrogating the representations of sexualities in selected novels by Gabriel Garc{226}ia M{226}arquez. en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.department English Studies en
dc.description.department African Languages


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