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Incidence and mechanism of antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus Agalactiae isolates from pregnant women and their babies at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Pretoria

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dc.contributor.advisor Lebelo, S.L.
dc.contributor.advisor Moyo, S.R.
dc.contributor.author Bolukaoto, Yenga John
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-19T09:00:21Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-19T09:00:21Z
dc.date.issued 2014-10
dc.identifier.citation Bolukaoto, Yenga John (2014) Incidence and mechanism of antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus Agalactiae isolates from pregnant women and their babies at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Pretoria, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/14402> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/14402
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal infections and deaths in human. It can also cause infections in pregnant women and non-pregnant adults. Penicillin and ampicillin are antibiotics of choice for the treatment of GBS infections. Erythromycin and clindamycin are used as alternative therapy in penicillin allergic patients, however resistance to these agents has been increasingly observed. This present study was undertaken to determine the colonization rate of GBS, susceptibility profile and the mechanism of antibiotic resistance in pregnant women and their babies at Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Pretoria. METHODS: Rectal and vaginal swabs were collected from pregnant women; ear and umbilical swabs from newborns over an 11 month period. Samples were cultured on selective media (CNA agar and Todd-Hewitt broth) and GBS positively identified using morphological and biochemical tests including Gram staining, hemolytic activity, catalase test, bile esculin, CAMP test and Latex agglutination test. The susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer and E-test methods. The D-test method was used to determine the inducible clindamycin resistance. Multiplex PCR with were used to detect different genes coding for resistance. RESULTS: Out of the 413 patients evaluated, 128 (30.9%) were positive with GBS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin and ampicillin. Erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was 21.1% and 17.2% respectively; of which 69% harbouring constitutive MLBB, 17.4% inducible MLSB. The alteration of ribosomal target encoded by ermB genes was the commonest mechanism of resistance observed in 55% of isolates, 38% of isolates had both ermB and linB genes and efflux pump mediated by mefA genes was detected in one of isolates. Conclusion: This study reaffirms the appropriateness of penicillin as the antibiotic of choice for treating GBS infection. However it raises the challenges of resistance to the macrolides and lincosamides. More GBS treatment options for penicillin allergic patients need to be researched. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (xiv, 82 leaves) : color illustrations
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Group B streptococcus (GBS) en
dc.subject Antibiotic susceptibility en
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance en
dc.subject Gene of resistance en
dc.subject Mechanism of resistance en
dc.subject Multiplex polymerase chain reaction en
dc.subject Pregnant women en
dc.subject Newborn babies en
dc.subject Pretoria, South Africa en
dc.subject.ddc 615.7922
dc.subject.lcsh Streptococcus agalactiae
dc.subject.lcsh Streptococcus agalactiae -- Microbiology
dc.subject.lcsh Communicable diseases in newborn infants
dc.subject.lcsh Communicable diseases in pregnancy
dc.subject.lcsh Neonatal infections
dc.subject.lcsh Penicillin
dc.title Incidence and mechanism of antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus Agalactiae isolates from pregnant women and their babies at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Pretoria en
dc.type Dissertation en
dc.description.department Health Studies en
dc.description.degree M.Sc. (Life Sciences (Microbiology))


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