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An investigation of the Democratic Alliance's political public relations campaign in the 2009 South African general elections including how social networking site Facebook was leveraged to help increase the party's vote-share

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dc.contributor.advisor Karam, Beschara
dc.contributor.author Dhawraj, Ronesh
dc.date.accessioned 2013-10-02T11:30:45Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-02T11:30:45Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-02
dc.identifier.citation Dhawraj, Ronesh (2013) An investigation of the Democratic Alliance's political public relations campaign in the 2009 South African general elections including how social networking site Facebook was leveraged to help increase the party's vote-share, University of South Africa, Pretoria, <http://hdl.handle.net/10500/10602> en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10500/10602
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines the political public relations campaign of the Democratic Alliance in the 2009 elections in order to explain the party’s performance in these elections. The research is premised on John Petrocik’s (1996) issue ownership theory. A number of quantitative and qualitative content analyses were conducted to provide answers to the main research questions. These involved: the party’s 286 media releases; party leader Helen Zille’s 2009 campaign speeches; and Zille’s Facebook platform. Results revealed that although the DA demonstrated extreme political resilience amidst fierce challenges in the 2009 elections, the party primarily campaigned on an anti-ANC ticket and a fair amount of negative advertising against the governing party to win itself votes. Not only did the party fail to “associate” itself with real issues affecting South African voters—especially the poor Black African majority which constitutes the largest voting bloc—it failed to pronounce itself clearly on other issues. Instead, the party attached itself to a multitude of shared issues, often “trespassing” on issues of common concern not necessarily “owned” by any one political party. This study also deduced that while Facebook facilitated public opinion on the DA in the 2009 elections, it still could not be regarded as a genuine public sphere in the South African context. en
dc.format.extent 1 online resource (325 p.)
dc.language.iso en en
dc.rights University of South Africa
dc.subject.ddc 324.730968
dc.subject.lcsh Elections -- South Africa
dc.subject.lcsh Democratic Alliance (South Africa)-- Elections
dc.subject.lcsh Online social networks -- South Africa -- Elections
dc.subject.lcsh Social media -- South Africa -- Elections
dc.subject.lcsh Facebook (Electronic resource)-- Elections
dc.title An investigation of the Democratic Alliance's political public relations campaign in the 2009 South African general elections including how social networking site Facebook was leveraged to help increase the party's vote-share en
dc.type Dissertation en
dc.description.department Communication Science en
dc.description.degree M.A. (Communication)


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